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Great Monet Exhibition at Houston Museum of Fine Arts

Camille Monet and a Child in the Artist's Garden in Argenteuil, 1875; this painting of Monet's wife sewing in front of their rose garden was my favorite of the pieces included in this exhibition; I just loved the colors and harmony

Camille Monet and a Child in the Artist's Garden in Argenteuil, 1875; this painting of Monet's wife sewing in front of their rose garden was my favorite of the pieces included in this exhibition; I just loved the colors and harmony

Grainstack (Snow Effect), 1891; the wheat stacks represented Monet's first series paintings; a critic said 'the grouping together of 15 canvases, each representing the same subject, is an extraordinarily victorious artistic demonstration'

Grainstack (Snow Effect), 1891; the wheat stacks represented Monet's first series paintings; a critic said 'the grouping together of 15 canvases, each representing the same subject, is an extraordinarily victorious artistic demonstration'

Water Lilies, 1907; in May 1909, Monet presented this work, along with 47 other water-lily paintings, at a highly successful exhibition in the gallery of his art dealer; this isn't one of my favorites from the series

Water Lilies, 1907; in May 1909, Monet presented this work, along with 47 other water-lily paintings, at a highly successful exhibition in the gallery of his art dealer; this isn't one of my favorites from the series

The Water Lily Pond, 1900; one of a series of this particular view, this composition is among his first to emphasize the reflections of the densely packed trees on the flat surface of the water

The Water Lily Pond, 1900; one of a series of this particular view, this composition is among his first to emphasize the reflections of the densely packed trees on the flat surface of the water

Grand Canal, Venice, 1908; Monet once told his wife that Venice was 'too beautiful to paint;' I generally love Monet's work but I prefer more accurate representations of Venice, like those of Canaletto

Grand Canal, Venice, 1908; Monet once told his wife that Venice was 'too beautiful to paint;' I generally love Monet's work but I prefer more accurate representations of Venice, like those of Canaletto

Antibes, Afternoon Effect, 1888; Monet spent January to May in this town on the French Riviera, avoiding the dreariest months in Paris, to satisfy his dealer's appetite for sun-drenched, idyllic seascapes

Antibes, Afternoon Effect, 1888; Monet spent January to May in this town on the French Riviera, avoiding the dreariest months in Paris, to satisfy his dealer's appetite for sun-drenched, idyllic seascapes

Fisherman's Cottage on the Cliffs at Varengeville, 1882; built as lookout posts for customs agents during the Napoleonic Wars, houses like this were commonly used in the late 19th century by fishermen to store their nets

Fisherman's Cottage on the Cliffs at Varengeville, 1882; built as lookout posts for customs agents during the Napoleonic Wars, houses like this were commonly used in the late 19th century by fishermen to store their nets

Snow at Argenteuil, c. 1874; likely inspired by Japanese woodblock prints, this scene of a road near Monet's house is unusual for its attempt to capture actual snowfall; the subject appealed to Monet's desire to capture the effects of light and weather

Snow at Argenteuil, c. 1874; likely inspired by Japanese woodblock prints, this scene of a road near Monet's house is unusual for its attempt to capture actual snowfall; the subject appealed to Monet's desire to capture the effects of light and weather

Cap Martin, near Menton, 1884; Monet often spent weeks scouting painting locales commenting that 'you need to live in a place for quite a while in order to paint it, you need to have worked laboriously to render it confidently'

Cap Martin, near Menton, 1884; Monet often spent weeks scouting painting locales commenting that 'you need to live in a place for quite a while in order to paint it, you need to have worked laboriously to render it confidently'

Meadow at GIverny, 1886; for fans of Monet, I recommend visiting his home, studio and gardens in Giverny, 50 miles WNW of Paris; because of Monet, the village attracted many Impressionist artists with the town now having a museum dedicated to their work

Meadow at GIverny, 1886; for fans of Monet, I recommend visiting his home, studio and gardens in Giverny, 50 miles WNW of Paris; because of Monet, the village attracted many Impressionist artists with the town now having a museum dedicated to their work

Boulevard Saint-Denis, Argenteuil, in Winter, 1875; when Monet lived in Argenteuil in the 1870s, the town was in the process of transforming from a small village to a Paris commuter suburb; Monet's house is on the right with the peaked roof

Boulevard Saint-Denis, Argenteuil, in Winter, 1875; when Monet lived in Argenteuil in the 1870s, the town was in the process of transforming from a small village to a Paris commuter suburb; Monet's house is on the right with the peaked roof

Road at La Cavee, Pourville, 1882; while he sometimes painted distinctive geological formations along the coast, more often Monet's compositions focused on unassuming features, such as this country road turning among grassy hillocks

Road at La Cavee, Pourville, 1882; while he sometimes painted distinctive geological formations along the coast, more often Monet's compositions focused on unassuming features, such as this country road turning among grassy hillocks

Meadow with Haystacks near GIverny, 1885; the largest Haystacks collections are held at the Musée d'Orsay and Musée Marmottan Monet in Paris, and in the Art Institute of Chicago; this piece is one of the first in the series

Meadow with Haystacks near GIverny, 1885; the largest Haystacks collections are held at the Musée d'Orsay and Musée Marmottan Monet in Paris, and in the Art Institute of Chicago; this piece is one of the first in the series

Posted by VagabondCowboy 11:06

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