A Travellerspoint blog

European masterpieces from Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, pt 1

The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, moved to this location in 1909, across from Northeastern University and close to the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum; it was easily one of the best art museums I've ever visited

The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, moved to this location in 1909, across from Northeastern University and close to the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum; it was easily one of the best art museums I've ever visited

Madame Cezanne in a Red Armchair, Paul Cezanne, c. 1877; Hortense Fiquet, the artist's wife, was his most frequent and perhaps most patient (she looks resigned to her fate here) model - the subject of nearly 30 paintings

Madame Cezanne in a Red Armchair, Paul Cezanne, c. 1877; Hortense Fiquet, the artist's wife, was his most frequent and perhaps most patient (she looks resigned to her fate here) model - the subject of nearly 30 paintings

Weaver, Vincent van Gogh, 1884; between 1883 and 1884, Van Gogh executed at least 28 works of weavers in the Dutch town of Nuenen where he was living; he had been inspired by Millet's depictions of honest, hard workers

Weaver, Vincent van Gogh, 1884; between 1883 and 1884, Van Gogh executed at least 28 works of weavers in the Dutch town of Nuenen where he was living; he had been inspired by Millet's depictions of honest, hard workers

Portrait of a Woman, Pablo Picasso, 1910; Cubism, the watershed style invented by Picasso and Georges Braque, created a new and ambiguous relationship between three-dimensional forms and the flat surface of the canvas

Portrait of a Woman, Pablo Picasso, 1910; Cubism, the watershed style invented by Picasso and Georges Braque, created a new and ambiguous relationship between three-dimensional forms and the flat surface of the canvas

Portrait of a Man Holding a Book, Titian, c. 1540; Titian was one of the first painters to use canvas as a support for nearly all of his portraits; he also exploited the three dimensional properties of oil paints to create broken strokes and bold touches

Portrait of a Man Holding a Book, Titian, c. 1540; Titian was one of the first painters to use canvas as a support for nearly all of his portraits; he also exploited the three dimensional properties of oil paints to create broken strokes and bold touches

Artist in His Studio, Rembrandt van Rijn, c. 1628; rather than showing the artist in the act of painting, Rembrandt focuses on the large and daunting surface to be painted; he heightens the drama with the intense light reflecting off the easel

Artist in His Studio, Rembrandt van Rijn, c. 1628; rather than showing the artist in the act of painting, Rembrandt focuses on the large and daunting surface to be painted; he heightens the drama with the intense light reflecting off the easel

Luis de Gongora y Argote, Diego Rodriguez de Silva y Velazquez, 1622; like his slightly younger contemporary Rembrandt, Velazquez's skill as both a painter and observer makes him one of history's greatest portraitists

Luis de Gongora y Argote, Diego Rodriguez de Silva y Velazquez, 1622; like his slightly younger contemporary Rembrandt, Velazquez's skill as both a painter and observer makes him one of history's greatest portraitists

Flowers in a Glass Vase, Hendrik de Fromantiou, 1668; this refined bouquet may be the artist's only work on copper; the artist worked in Berlin at the court of the Great Elector of Brandenburg, specializing in still lifes

Flowers in a Glass Vase, Hendrik de Fromantiou, 1668; this refined bouquet may be the artist's only work on copper; the artist worked in Berlin at the court of the Great Elector of Brandenburg, specializing in still lifes

Antibes, the Pink Cloud, Paul Signac, 1916; I loved the bright colors and mosaic-like nature of the brushwork in this painting; Signac commented that he saw different characters and personalities in the clouds

Antibes, the Pink Cloud, Paul Signac, 1916; I loved the bright colors and mosaic-like nature of the brushwork in this painting; Signac commented that he saw different characters and personalities in the clouds

Little Fourteen-Year-Old Dancer, Edgar Degas, 1878-81; this is Degas's largest surviving sculpture and the only one he titled and exhibited; the original wax version (this is bronze) was shown at the 1881 Impressionist exhibition in Paris

Little Fourteen-Year-Old Dancer, Edgar Degas, 1878-81; this is Degas's largest surviving sculpture and the only one he titled and exhibited; the original wax version (this is bronze) was shown at the 1881 Impressionist exhibition in Paris

Gardener Standing by a Haystack, Overcast Sky, Eragny, Camille Pissarro, 1899; the artist spent the last 2 decades of his life in the small village of Eragny-sur-Epte, NW of Paris; he experimented with Pointillism but primarily adhered to Impressionism

Gardener Standing by a Haystack, Overcast Sky, Eragny, Camille Pissarro, 1899; the artist spent the last 2 decades of his life in the small village of Eragny-sur-Epte, NW of Paris; he experimented with Pointillism but primarily adhered to Impressionism

Women of Paris: The Circus Lover, James Jacques Joseph Tissot, 1885; the event depicted here is a 'high life circus,' in which the amateur performers were members of the aristocracy; it's humorous to think who might participate in such a circus these days

Women of Paris: The Circus Lover, James Jacques Joseph Tissot, 1885; the event depicted here is a 'high life circus,' in which the amateur performers were members of the aristocracy; it's humorous to think who might participate in such a circus these days

Mary Sears (later Mrs. Francis Shaw), Joseph Florentin Leon Bonnat, 1878; Bonnat chose to display this portrait at the Paris Salon in 1879 before it rejoined the Sears family (obviously it was a commission) at their Beacon Hill home in Boston

Mary Sears (later Mrs. Francis Shaw), Joseph Florentin Leon Bonnat, 1878; Bonnat chose to display this portrait at the Paris Salon in 1879 before it rejoined the Sears family (obviously it was a commission) at their Beacon Hill home in Boston

Jug and Plate of Pears, Paul Cezanne, c. 1890-93; Cezanne is said to have been a loner - the artist was his own number one critic, who rarely liked his paintings, despite spending hours on them and demanding that his models (when he wasn't painting fruit) remain absolutely motionless

Jug and Plate of Pears, Paul Cezanne, c. 1890-93; Cezanne is said to have been a loner - the artist was his own number one critic, who rarely liked his paintings, despite spending hours on them and demanding that his models (when he wasn't painting fruit) remain absolutely motionless

Village Scene with a Canal, Jan Brueghel the Elder, 1609; more than half of Brueghel's 400  paintings were done on copper; this smooth support was especially well-suited to his miniaturist technique and colorful style

Village Scene with a Canal, Jan Brueghel the Elder, 1609; more than half of Brueghel's 400+ paintings were done on copper; this smooth support was especially well-suited to his miniaturist technique and colorful style

Dog at Rest, Gerrit Dou, 1650; the artist, who studied with Rembrandt as a teenager, captures this remarkably lifelike dog with soft fur, wet nose and leathery paws; you seldom see a pet in paintings of this era

Dog at Rest, Gerrit Dou, 1650; the artist, who studied with Rembrandt as a teenager, captures this remarkably lifelike dog with soft fur, wet nose and leathery paws; you seldom see a pet in paintings of this era

Flowers in a Terracotta Vase, Jan van Huysum, 1730; I love the artist's ability to render the variety and minutia of the natural world (notice the fly on the tulip or the ants on the peonies)

Flowers in a Terracotta Vase, Jan van Huysum, 1730; I love the artist's ability to render the variety and minutia of the natural world (notice the fly on the tulip or the ants on the peonies)

Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?, Paul Gauguin, 1897-98; Gauguin had moved from France to Tahiti 6 years before but struggled financially, clashed with local officials and his mental and physical health declined

Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?, Paul Gauguin, 1897-98; Gauguin had moved from France to Tahiti 6 years before but struggled financially, clashed with local officials and his mental and physical health declined

Posted by VagabondCowboy 04:39

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