A Travellerspoint blog

The Hall of Presidents from the Natl Portrait Gallery in DC

George Washington, Gilbert Stuart, 1796; this life-size, iconic portrait of Washington is one of his most famous; the portrait was owned by the British for 170 yrs before the National Portrait Gallery bought it in 2001 for $20 million

George Washington, Gilbert Stuart, 1796; this life-size, iconic portrait of Washington is one of his most famous; the portrait was owned by the British for 170 yrs before the National Portrait Gallery bought it in 2001 for $20 million

Barack Obama, Kehinde Wiley, 2018; the chrysanthemums are the official flower of Chicago, the jasmine evokes Hawaii and the African blue lilies denote his Kenyan heritage; I liked Obama's portrait much more than that of Michelle

Barack Obama, Kehinde Wiley, 2018; the chrysanthemums are the official flower of Chicago, the jasmine evokes Hawaii and the African blue lilies denote his Kenyan heritage; I liked Obama's portrait much more than that of Michelle

Thomas Jefferson, Rembrandt Peale, 1805; opened in 1968, the National Portrait Gallery is the only museum in the United States dedicated solely to portraiture; they now have 23,000  items in their collection

Thomas Jefferson, Rembrandt Peale, 1805; opened in 1968, the National Portrait Gallery is the only museum in the United States dedicated solely to portraiture; they now have 23,000+ items in their collection

William J Clinton, Chuck Close, 2006; a hallmark of the National Portrait Gallery's permanent collection is the Hall of Presidents, which contains portraits of all American presidents

William J Clinton, Chuck Close, 2006; a hallmark of the National Portrait Gallery's permanent collection is the Hall of Presidents, which contains portraits of all American presidents

George W Bush, Robert Anderson, 2008; Bush selected Anderson, with whom he went to Yale, to create this painting for the National Portrait Gallery; Bush wanted an informal image, posing in shirtsleeves at Camp David

George W Bush, Robert Anderson, 2008; Bush selected Anderson, with whom he went to Yale, to create this painting for the National Portrait Gallery; Bush wanted an informal image, posing in shirtsleeves at Camp David

George Washington, Rembrandt Peale, 1795; Peale was only 17 when he completed this work after his father had convinced Washington to sit for the portrait

George Washington, Rembrandt Peale, 1795; Peale was only 17 when he completed this work after his father had convinced Washington to sit for the portrait

Richard Nixon, Norman Rockwell, 1968; admitting that Nixon's appearance was troublesomely elusive, Rockwell chose to intentionally flatter him; he doesn't even look like a crook here

Richard Nixon, Norman Rockwell, 1968; admitting that Nixon's appearance was troublesomely elusive, Rockwell chose to intentionally flatter him; he doesn't even look like a crook here

Jimmy Carter, Herbert Abrams, 1982; the National Portrait Gallery is the only place, other than the White House, that has portraits of every president; as part of the Smithsonian, admission is free

Jimmy Carter, Herbert Abrams, 1982; the National Portrait Gallery is the only place, other than the White House, that has portraits of every president; as part of the Smithsonian, admission is free

Thomas Jefferson, Gilbert Stuart, 1821; after sitting for his portrait in 1805, Jefferson waited sixteen years before it was finally delivered; Jefferson designed his own tombstone which listed many accomplishments but doesn't mention being president

Thomas Jefferson, Gilbert Stuart, 1821; after sitting for his portrait in 1805, Jefferson waited sixteen years before it was finally delivered; Jefferson designed his own tombstone which listed many accomplishments but doesn't mention being president

Abraham Lincoln, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, 1887; the sculptor relied on his recollection of the impression that Lincoln made on him during Lincoln’s famous 1860 Cooper Union speech

Abraham Lincoln, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, 1887; the sculptor relied on his recollection of the impression that Lincoln made on him during Lincoln’s famous 1860 Cooper Union speech

George Washington, Jean-Antoine Houdon, 1786; in 1784, the Virginia General Assembly wanted a statue of Washington that would be the very best for its statehouse; Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson selected Houdon

George Washington, Jean-Antoine Houdon, 1786; in 1784, the Virginia General Assembly wanted a statue of Washington that would be the very best for its statehouse; Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson selected Houdon

Posted by VagabondCowboy 03:58

Email this entryFacebookStumbleUpon

Table of contents

Be the first to comment on this entry.

This blog requires you to be a logged in member of Travellerspoint to place comments.

Login