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Diving Russian warship on Cayman Brac

M/V Captain Keith Tibbetts was built by Russia for the Cuban Navy in 1984; it was later purchased by the Caymanian government (and given its current name) and intentionally sunk in 1996

M/V Captain Keith Tibbetts was built by Russia for the Cuban Navy in 1984; it was later purchased by the Caymanian government (and given its current name) and intentionally sunk in 1996

This is the resident Goliath grouper that lives at the wreck; he followed us around the ship perhaps thinking we would feed him

This is the resident Goliath grouper that lives at the wreck; he followed us around the ship perhaps thinking we would feed him

Bob's photos are infinitely better than mine; our first dive together was a big success

Bob's photos are infinitely better than mine; our first dive together was a big success

My photo of giant tube sponges was photobombed by this fish

My photo of giant tube sponges was photobombed by this fish

The occasional barracuda was spotted; Bob wore his shorty wetsuit and got chilled while I went without a wetsuit and was never uncomfortable

The occasional barracuda was spotted; Bob wore his shorty wetsuit and got chilled while I went without a wetsuit and was never uncomfortable

The wreck is the only Russian warship that divers can explore in the Western Hemisphere

The wreck is the only Russian warship that divers can explore in the Western Hemisphere

Cleaner fish accompanying a stingray along the sandy bottom

Cleaner fish accompanying a stingray along the sandy bottom

Barrel sponge; the wreck was torn in two by a Norwester in 1999; the bow sits in about 100 feet of water

Barrel sponge; the wreck was torn in two by a Norwester in 1999; the bow sits in about 100 feet of water

In addition to these tube sponges there were lots of sea fans and even a camera-shy turtle

In addition to these tube sponges there were lots of sea fans and even a camera-shy turtle

The Tibbetts is the most iconic wreck dive in the Cayman Islands; Hurricane Ivan in 2004 did further damage to the wreck

The Tibbetts is the most iconic wreck dive in the Cayman Islands; Hurricane Ivan in 2004 did further damage to the wreck

The barrel sponges came in a variety of vibrant colors; shore diving is very popular on the island

The barrel sponges came in a variety of vibrant colors; shore diving is very popular on the island

The Tibbetts wreck is 330 feet long; visibility was very good with a few areas inside of the ship open for exploration

The Tibbetts wreck is 330 feet long; visibility was very good with a few areas inside of the ship open for exploration

Large barrel sponge; the Tibbetts sits about 200m offshore making for a long swim, especially in choppy seas

Large barrel sponge; the Tibbetts sits about 200m offshore making for a long swim, especially in choppy seas

I had trouble distinguishing sponges from corals; thankfully saw no jellyfish or lionfish

I had trouble distinguishing sponges from corals; thankfully saw no jellyfish or lionfish

There are only 2 dive shops on the island; their boat dives were fully booked so one shop had no equipment to rent while the other typically doesn't rent to shore divers but thankfully they made an exception for me

There are only 2 dive shops on the island; their boat dives were fully booked so one shop had no equipment to rent while the other typically doesn't rent to shore divers but thankfully they made an exception for me

Posted by VagabondCowboy 18:13

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