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Hida Folk Village-rural Japanese life centuries ago

30  buildings were moved from different parts of the Hida region to preserve traditional houses and lifestyles as well as the cultural heritage

30+ buildings were moved from different parts of the Hida region to preserve traditional houses and lifestyles as well as the cultural heritage

Takumi Shrine; the village opened in 1971 so visitors could see what daily life used to be like in rural Japan

Takumi Shrine; the village opened in 1971 so visitors could see what daily life used to be like in rural Japan

Tomita's House, dating from the mid-1700s, was a successful way station on the main road through the region; transportation was primarily with oxen and horses (and on foot)

Tomita's House, dating from the mid-1700s, was a successful way station on the main road through the region; transportation was primarily with oxen and horses (and on foot)

Since most people didn't have watches, monks would strike this bell to indicate the time; 6am and 6pm would signify the opening and closing of business for the day

Since most people didn't have watches, monks would strike this bell to indicate the time; 6am and 6pm would signify the opening and closing of business for the day

It's great that these old buildings could be preserved; by moving them to a central location, they make it easy for visitors and school kids to learn the regional history

It's great that these old buildings could be preserved; by moving them to a central location, they make it easy for visitors and school kids to learn the regional history

Nishioka's House belonged to the chief priest of a Buddhist temple; the houses here are characterized by open floor plans and steep roofs to prevent snow from accumulating

Nishioka's House belonged to the chief priest of a Buddhist temple; the houses here are characterized by open floor plans and steep roofs to prevent snow from accumulating

Wakayama's House; it's amazing that with the houses made of wood and thatched roofs that the houses didn't burn down all the time

Wakayama's House; it's amazing that with the houses made of wood and thatched roofs that the houses didn't burn down all the time

Taguchi's House; the head of the village lived here for several generations; meetings were often held here, so the rooms are designed to make one big room using sliding doors

Taguchi's House; the head of the village lived here for several generations; meetings were often held here, so the rooms are designed to make one big room using sliding doors

Artisans were working on traditional arts and crafts in several houses; the artisans were making Hida quilts, straw crafts, wood carvings, weavings, ceramics and roof shingles

Artisans were working on traditional arts and crafts in several houses; the artisans were making Hida quilts, straw crafts, wood carvings, weavings, ceramics and roof shingles

Michikami's House dates from the early 1800s; the bottom portion of the roof was cut off to get more sunlight into the house for the silkworm industry on the upper floor

Michikami's House dates from the early 1800s; the bottom portion of the roof was cut off to get more sunlight into the house for the silkworm industry on the upper floor

Cherry blossoms and water mill; most of the buildings are open and are filled with artifacts from their respective periods, including spindles, silkworm raising artifacts, cooking utensils, and clothing

Cherry blossoms and water mill; most of the buildings are open and are filled with artifacts from their respective periods, including spindles, silkworm raising artifacts, cooking utensils, and clothing

Mill; there is a workshop illustrating how many of Japan's famous handicrafts are made, including wood carving, tie-dying, weaving and lacquer work

Mill; there is a workshop illustrating how many of Japan's famous handicrafts are made, including wood carving, tie-dying, weaving and lacquer work

Posted by VagabondCowboy 04:07

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